Introduction  
  What is food?  
  What happens to the food we eat?  
Our nutrient needs  
  Energy balance  
  Nutritional status  
  Laws & labels
  Additives & colours  
  Toxicity in food  
  Processing food  
  Stability of food nutrients  
  Storage life of foods  
  Food- associated health problems  

- Food Law -

Ingredient labelling

When a statement of ingredients appears on the label, all the ingredients must be listed and they must be listed in descending order of their relative amounts. This is useful for giving an indication of the ingredient present in the greatest quantity.

Water, however, may be declared last by the words 'water added: irrespective of its proportion. Not all foods are required to have their ingredients listed. For example, when certain foods such as margarine, chocolate or bacon are used as ingredients in other foods, the ingredients of the ingredients will generally not be listed on the label.

In addition, some foods, such as some alcoholic beverages and cheeses, are exempt from listing their ingredients. The labelling requirements of foods containing food additives are explained in the next section.

See also:

Labelling and the law

Nutrition labelling

Date-marking of food

What do the different forms of date-marking mean?

Food Facts
- Food Law
- Labelling and the law
Ingredent labelling
- Nutrition labelling
- Date-marking of food
- What do the different forms of date-marking mean?
- Special purpose foods
Figures:
22: Infomation on a food label
23: Low-joule foods (low energy)
24: Carbohydrate- modified foods
25: Foods containing no added sugar
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