Introduction  
  What is food?  
  What happens to the food we eat?  
Our nutrient needs  
  Energy balance  
  Nutritional status  
  Laws & labels
  Additives & colours  
  Toxicity in food  
  Processing food  
  Stability of food nutrients  
  Storage life of foods  
  Food- associated health problems  

- Food Law -

Labelling and the law

The law in most Western countries requires that certain information be present on every package of food that is sold. There must be the common name of the food, the name and address of the manufacturer or packer, and the country where the food was packed.

The label must not contain any statement that is false or misleading in any particular concerning the food, and must not include any statement relating to a medical condition; only claims relating to the properties of the food are allowed. In the future, certain health-related claims and information may be permitted on food labels.

See also:

Ingredent labelling

Nutrition labelling

Date-marking of food

What do the different forms of date-marking mean?

Food Facts
- Food Law
Labelling and the law
- Ingredent labelling
- Nutrition labelling
- Date-marking of food
- What do the different forms of date-marking mean?
- Special purpose foods
Figures:
22: Infomation on a food label
23: Low-joule foods (low energy)
24: Carbohydrate- modified foods
25: Foods containing no added sugar
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