Using the food charts  
  Important basics  
  Fat-soluble vitamins  
Water-soluble vitamins  
  Elements  
  Others

- Other Chemical Elements in Food -

49: CAFFEINE

Caffeine Find out more about this term occurs naturally in a variety of plants. The main dietary sources of caffeine are coffee, tea, cocoa and cola-type beverages. In addition, some drugs contain caffeine. Undoubtedly the popularity of these beverages is due to the stimulant effect of caffeine. Individuals react differently to caffeine and, in addition to stimulation, caffeine can cause other effects, such as insomnia, frequent urination, stomach upsets, nervousness and irritability. Caffeine and coffee drinking have also been associated with heart disease and birth defects. Although there is no clear-cut evidence to support these studies, it would be prudent if you are pregnant to limit caffeine intake.

The amount of caffeine consumed in tea or coffee depends on factors such as the variety used, the length of brewing time, and the size of the cup. With decaffeinated coffee, over 95 per cent of the caffeine is removed prior to roasting. Cocoa contains only a small amount of caffeine, but has larger amounts of theobromine, a substance that has somewhat similar effects to those of caffeine.

FIGURE 64: CAFFEINE CONTENT OF SOME BEVERAGES

  BEVERAGE   CAFFEINE CONTENT
  (milligrams per 150 millilitre cup)
Brewed coffee
Instant coffee
Decaffeinated coffee
Tea
Cocoa
Cola-type soft drinks

85
60
3
50
5(+250 milligrams of theobromine)
35 (per can)

 

Other Chemical
Elements in
Food
- Other Elements
- Lecithin
Caffine
- Gluten

Also on this page:

-  Figure 64: Caffeine
   content of some
   beverages

 

 

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